Chao wu xiang sen

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Chao wu xiang sen

Chao wu xiang sen

Chinese five-spice powder works very well with soy sauce and cabbage, which might be served with barbecued beef, pork, or duck. The Sichuan pepper it contains has a brilliant tongue-tingling effect. Chinese chives or garlic chives are more strongly flavored than the more common chives found in supermarkets. They are usually cooked to soften the flavors, and are particularly good in stirfries. Chinese chives are available in Chinese and Asian food stores. If you can’t find them, use a combination of scallions and ordinary chives.
Ingredients

– Serves 4–6.
– 1 tbsp vegetable oil.
– 1 small Chinese cabbage or firm white cabbage, cut into equal-sized chunks about 2in (5cm) square.
– 3 heads of baby bok choy, cut into equalsized.
– chunks about 2in (5cm) square.
– 10 purple sprouting broccoli stalks, cut.
– into 2in (5cm) lengths.
– 10 fresh asparagus spears, cut into.
– 2in (5cm) lengths.
– 2 tbsp soy sauce.
– 6 scallions (green onions), thinly sliced.
– ½ cup fresh bean sprouts.
– 20 Chinese chives, snipped into.
– 3 equal lengths.
– handful of fresh cilantro leaves.
– salt and freshly ground black pepper.
– For the paste.
– grated zest of 2 limes.
– juice of 1 lime.
– 2in (5cm) piece fresh ginger, grated.
– 1 tsp five-spice powder.
– 1 tbsp soy sauce.

Instructions

Step 1: To make the paste, mix all the ingredients together in a bowl. Heat the oil in a wok over medium-high heat. Add the cabbage, bok choy, broccoli, asparagus, and 1 tbsp of the soy sauce. Stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the paste, and continue to stir-fry for another 2 minutes, or until the vegetables are just tender. Next add the remaining tablespoon of soy sauce with the scallions, bean sprouts, and Chinese chives. Cook until wilted, then add the cilantro. Taste and check the seasoning, and adjust as needed. Serve immediately, alongside grilled fish or meat, and other Asian-style dishes.

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